Tag Archives: uk

82% of festival-goers ‘feel confident’ to return to live events after COVID-19 lockdown is lifted (report)

After weeks of debate about what post-quarantine live music will look like and if fans will even be comfortable attending shows once lockdowns are lifted, today, we have some positive news for the live music industry:

Around 82% of music fans “would feel confident” attending a festival within one to six months after the COVID-19 lockdown ends.

Furthermore, within that group, 66% would feel confident enough to attend within one to three months, while 30% would happily do so immediately after lockdown is lifted.

That’s according to a report published by UK-born festival ticket and travel booking platform Festicket, which surveyed over 110,000 festival-goers from countries such as the UK, France, Germany and the Netherlands.

Day festivals topped the list of events respondents indicated that they are happy to return to first once lockdown is lifted but around 70% said they’d also happily go to a weekend festival.

Meanwhile, 59.5% of people said they would feel confident attending music events in their own country and globally in 2021.

Additionally, 75% of festival-goers are confident that 2021’s season will be unaffected and that they’d feel confident booking tickets for 2021 events within the next two months.

Similarly, festival-goers believe they’ll still spend big on their future festival trips, with 34% saying they’ll spend between €250-€500, while another 24% said they’ll spend more than €500.

The survey also found that festival-goers expect live events to introduce safety measures such as hand sanitizing stations, operating at a reduced capacity, and offering free cancellation on tickets.

Over 82% of festival-goers said that free cancellation would be a key consideration when booking future events.

“Despite all the current uncertainty, it’s reassuring to see a high percentage of festival-goers have a positive outlook for the live events industry.”

Luis Sousa, Festicket 

Festicket Marketing Director Luis Sousa, said: “Despite all the current uncertainty, it’s reassuring to see a high percentage of festival-goers have a positive outlook for the live events industry, backed up by over 75% saying they’d feel comfortable booking events for 2021.

“Unsurprisingly, we are of course entering the beginning of a ‘new normal’ for events where festival-goers – in the short term at least – will expect promoters and venues to adapt their offering to ease anxieties.

“We’ve already seen this in some venues that have begun opening their doors again, with measures such as reduced capacity and compulsory table service being part of the deal of reopening.”

Last February, Festicket secured funding of $4.6 million from Edge Investments, which followed the $10.5m series D funding round it closed in 2018, led by transatlantic venture capital firm Beringea.

Picture credit: Hanny NaibahoMusic Business Worldwide

Duran Duran inks global publishing deal with Warner Chappell Music

Warner Chappell Music has entered into a global publishing agreement with iconic British band Duran Duran.

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The deal will see Warner Chappell administer the majority of the award-winning, multi-platinum group’s catalog from 1986 to date, as well as all current and future compositions.

Included are albums such as Notorious, Duran Duran (The Wedding Album), Astronaut, Red Carpet Massacre, and Paper Gods, encompassing the global hits Notorious, All She Wants Is, Ordinary World, Come Undone, (Reach Up for the) Sunrise, Pressure Off and more.

Duran Duran’s next studio album is slated for release in the fall of 2020.

Since making their debut in 1981, Duran Duran – singer Simon Le Bon, keyboardist Nick Rhodes, bassist John Taylor, and drummer Roger Taylor — have sold more than 100 million records across the globe.

They’ve scored 30 Top 20 singles in the UK, as well as 21 hits on the Billboard Hot 100.

The band’s many honors include two Ivor Novellos, two Grammy Awards, two BRIT Awards – including the 2004 award for Outstanding Contribution to Music, an MTV Video Music Award for Lifetime Achievement, and a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Duran Duran’s most recent studio album, Paper Gods, became their highest-charting release in over two decades, hitting the top five in the UK and the top ten in the US.

The upcoming release of their new studio album will be accompanied by a major world tour.

“All of us at Warner Chappell are immensely pleased that Duran Duran has chosen Warner Chappell as their new publishing home, and we welcome Roger, Simon, Nick, and John into the family.”

Carianne Marshall & Guy Moot, Warner Chappell Music

“Duran Duran redefined the modern pop landscape in the ‘80s, and over the past four decades, they’ve remained endlessly creative, continuing to evolve and reinvent themselves,” said Warner Chappell Music Co-Chair & COO Carianne Marshall and Co-Chair & CEO Guy Moot.

“As brilliant songwriters and visual pioneers, the band’s distinctive, original approach has continued to influence successive generations of artists, even as they have continued to raise the bar.

“All of us at Warner Chappell are immensely pleased that Duran Duran has chosen Warner Chappell as their new publishing home, and we welcome Roger, Simon, Nick, and John into the family.”

“We are very much looking forward to this new partnership and to a successful future together for our catalog.”

Simon Le Bon, Duran Duran

Speaking on behalf of the band, singer Simon Le Bon, added: “We worked with both Carianne and Guy before they joined Warner Chappell, and we have long admired the kind of creative approach they bring to publishing.

“We are very much looking forward to this new partnership and to a successful future together for our catalog.”

Photo Credit: Stephanie Pistel Music Business Worldwide

UK songwriters & composers generated close to $1bn in music royalties last year

British collection society PRS for Music collected a record £810.8m (approximately $990m) on behalf of its 145,000 songwriter, composer and music publisher members in 2019, a year-on-year increase of 8.7% or £65m ($79) .

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According to PRS, its net costs for collecting royalties reduced by 6.7% YoY to £87.5m ($107m), and after charitable donations of £3.2m ($4m), resulted in distributable revenue to members of £721.1m ($877m).

During the 12 months to December 31, 2019, PRS reports that a record £686m ($834) was processed and paid out, an increase of 13.7% on 2018.

In spite of the record results, PRS for Music CEO Andrea C. Martin warned that “we will inevitably see a decline in future royalties in 2020 and into 2021” due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Said Martin: “While our 2019 financial results are record-breaking, we are all too aware that due to the coronavirus pandemic, the music industry and its community faces unprecedented times ahead.”

Elsewhere, International royalty income was the largest revenue stream for PRS for Music members in 2019, with £278.7m ($339m) collected through reciprocal agreements with societies around the world, a decrease of 1.1% on 2018, but 33.6% growth over a five year period.

Royalties generated from online platforms, including downloads, online video games, and streaming services like Spotify and Apple Music saw the most significant uplift, of £34.9m ($42m), or 24.2% to £179.1m ($218m).

Income from broadcasters including the BBC and ITV, totalled £130.8m ($160m), up 2.4% on 2018, despite a decline in linear TV viewing and the rise in popularity of video-on-demand.

Live performances of music in the UK and music used in UK business premises (collectively known as Public Performance) saw an increase of 15.7%, or £30.2m ($36m) on 2018 to £222.2m ($270m), PRS for Music’s second biggest area of revenue growth.

Meanwhile, royalties from live performances climbed 38.8% to £54m ($66m) in 2019.

“It is testament to the creative talent of our 145,500 members that royalty revenues from their music have continued to grow.”

Andrea C. Martin, PRS for Music

Andrea C. Martin, CEO, PRS for Music, said: “It is testament to the creative talent of our 145,500 members that royalty revenues from their music have continued to grow. The UK is a centre of creative excellence and this is something we should all be proud of and work to protect and promote.

“The way we consume music continues to change and PRS has made considerable investments over the last decade to ensure we’re well placed to capture future growth. Key for the industry is that all levels of the creative community can benefit from this growth.

“We are now focusing our efforts on future income and distributions. While our 2019 financial results are record-breaking, we are all too aware that due to the coronavirus pandemic, the music industry and its community faces unprecedented times ahead.

Added Martin: “With TV and film productions on hold, closure of businesses, public premises, and the cancellation of festivals, concerts and other live music events, we will inevitably see a decline in future royalties in 2020 and into 2021.

“We expect the most significant impact will be on our public performance business and the royalties we collect internationally, but at this stage the exact financial impact, and how this will affect individual members, is extremely difficult to fully predict.

“We are closely monitoring the situation from every angle possible and taking proactive steps to safeguard royalties and mitigate risk throughout this period of significant disruption.”

Pictured: British singer-songwriter MabelMusic Business Worldwide

MBW’s Hottest Independent Artists In The World: Eve Owen, Sky McCreery, Ruby Waters, Ben Kessler and ELIO

In a world where everyone is working remotely and digital scouting is the only way to discover hot new artists, how can you sift through the tens of thousands of tracks released every day to find the talent that matters?

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That’s where Instrumental comes in. A long-term partner of MBW, the company uses data science to comb streaming services and social media to discover and track new, commercially interesting artists every day. 

Over the last three years, Instrumental has developed a ‘hot score’ that flags artists daily that are seeing exceptional performance across a range of key metrics.

It is that pool of talent that goes on to big things, with the algorithm tipping acts like Surfaces, Tones and I, Lil Tecca and Anson Seabra months before they went mainstream. 

Now, every week, MBW will highlight five of the most exciting prospects from around the globe from within Instrumental’s current batch of ‘hot’ artists.

Eve Owen, Soul, UK

Soulful singer-songwriter Eve Owen has already toured and collaborated with The National and been Featured in The NME, so it’s not just the data singing her praises.

Instrumental first identified her as ‘hot’ on its platform back in November 2019.

However, in the last seven days, her Spotify follower count has surged a massive 25%, so this hot streak doesn’t look to be over anytime soon.

Her debut LP, Don’t Let the Ink Dry has been out for a week and it’s already gaining some serious traction.

Check out the stand out lead track She Says for some seriously chilled out piano work and delicate vocals.

Sky McCreery, pop, US

US-based Sky McCreery is up next on our list, helped in no small part by his truly stupendous social following – he’s a huge star on TikTok, with over 190,000 followers. And it’s no surprise really – his laid-back melancholy love songs have true commercial promise.

He first became ‘hot’ on Instrumental’s platform last weekend, after he announced to his followers that it is his voice in the version of Meredith Brackbill’s If you leave being featured in all those thousands of TikTok clips. For the uninitiated, here’s an example of what we’re talking about.

His most recent release Silhouette came out on April 28 and in an excellent example of lockdown innovation, he recorded a live bedroom video for it – check it out here.

Ruby Waters, r&b, Canada

Canadian born alt-pop/R&B songstress Ruby Waters was first identified as ‘hot’ by Instrumental’s platform back in May 2019.

Since then, she’s been championed by Ones to Watch, The Toronto Guardian and FYI Music.

She’s been a bit of a slow, but incredibly bright burn. She’s amassed 4,600 followers on Youtube and a similar figure on Instagram, but it’s Spotify where she’s really standing out, with over 126,000 monthly listeners!

If you love Halsey, FKA twigs or Lorde, then you’ll love Ruby Waters too. Stand out tracks include Sweet Sublime, Supernatural and Almost Naked.

Ben Kessler, pop, US

Ben Kessler is a self producing pop artist born and raised in Philadelphia, now residing in Nashville. His raw and husky vocals add an edge to his contemporary pop vibe, and his falsetto will definitely grab your attention! 

Ben first became a hot artist on the Instrumental platform late last month and has been on a ‘Hot’ streak for 15 days and counting. His latest track Just Wanna Be Your Friend (released on April 30) currently features on Young and Free which has 1.1m followers.

His most recent track has seen him feature in Ones to Watch, where it’s heralded as “..an easy listen and the type of tune you want to keep on repeat”.

We agree with that sentiment entirely, it really is that good of a song!

ELIO, pop, Canada

ELIO, aka Charlotte Grace Victoria, is a rising pop artist currently living in Canada. She’s released two tracks to date, and it seems that’s all she needed to make a wave in 2020! She has undeniably catchy beats along with an effortless tone to her singing which leaves you always wanting more.

She has been on a hot streak on the Instrumental platform for the last two weeks following her latest release Body Language which has 116,000 Spotify Streams and rising quickly. This track features on Pop Sauce and featured in New Music Friday UK.

ELIO’s debut single My Friends Online is a track which perfectly reflects the social media driven world we live in. Find the official music video here!

Over the period we are all impacted by COVID-19, Instrumental is offering a free digital scouting workshop to any music business looking to develop their talent discovery processes. Click here to sign up now!Music Business Worldwide

‘It’s going to be a long road for everybody to start seeing recovery in the live music industry.’

What, and when, might a return to live music look like?

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That’s the multi-billion dollar question on the lips of everyone who works in the business globally, as festivals, agencies and promoters deal with the fallout of losing what could be an entire year’s worth of income as a result of the coronavirus crisis.

Many are working on booking shows for 2021 on the assumption that gigs and organised mass gatherings won’t be able to safely take place until then.

When they do return, there’s talk of reduced capacity gigs and festivals, as is the case in Spain – where some venues have already been able to open at 30% capacity, and ticket-holders having to provide proof of health.

Whatever happens, there’s no doubt that the live industry is going to take a while to bounce-back to the level of growth it’s been enjoying over recent years.

According to figures from PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), global live music turnover from tickets and sponsorship hit $27.9bn in 2019 — a rise of 15.7% in five years. In the UK, the industry rose 10% to hit a record high of £1.1bn in 2018.

This year, with shows postponed (and ticket sales effectively stalled), Live Nation’s Q1 results offer some insight into what’s to come.

In the three months to the end of March, the company’s revenues fell significantly by 20% on a constant currency basis.

Its Concerts quarterly revenues were particularly affected, down 24% YoY to $993.4m. That’s despite the fact that for the majority of the Q1 period, gigs were still taking place.

Still, the company remains confident about a full return to strength in 2021 and beyond.

Live Nation Europe President John Reid is pleased to see that 90% of fans are holding onto tickets for the 80% of postponed shows that his company has been able to reschedule worldwide.

That “gives us confidence that we will see the industry ramp up quickly with attendance and fan engagement back up to par in 2021 and beyond,” he says.

“Until March we were seeing fan demand and artist touring increasing globally year on year. there’s no problem with supply and demand, which is why long term we are confident in the resilience of the live industry.”

John reid, live nation

“Until March we were seeing fan demand and artist touring increasing globally year on year – there’s no problem with supply and demand – which is why long term we are confident in the resilience of the live industry.”

Reid is hopeful of having tickets for 2021’s big tours on sale by the end of the year, which will help boost Live Nation’s liquidity.

In the meantime, whilst everyone is waiting for buildings to reopen to the public, “we are finding new ways to fill the live music gap including drive-in concerts, fan-less concerts from iconic venues, moving on to reduced capacity shows when possible,” he says.

The idea of reduced capacity shows is something many across the business have been discussing, but some raise concerns about how much economic sense it makes.

As Paradigm agent Rob Challice explains: “Maybe a small venue can make sense of [reduced capacity], but not a venue that’s 500 – 5,000 cap.

“If you take an average 1.5k – 2k cap venue and average ticket price, [consider that] production, staffing and marketing costs usually account for at least 50% of the sales income. Most promoters that use medium/large venues have voiced this, and the venues themselves have said the same.”

There’s also the small issue of paying the artist and their team, insurance, ticketing company fees and promoter profit. In other words, a significantly reduced capacity show runs a high risk of running into the red at a time when those who stand to earn can’t afford to cover any level of loss.

“Reduced capacities just don’t work and make no economic sense in any environment.”

stuart galbraith, kilimanjaro live

Kilimanjaro Live CEO Stuart Galbraith says the reduced capacity rule in Spain was brought in without any consultation with the live sector, and that the UK’s discussions with Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s government focus on ensuring “they don’t bring in something or suggest something that is not workable.”

Says Galbraith: “Reduced capacities just don’t work and make no economic sense in any environment — standing or seated. To run a socially distanced theatre gig, for instance, you’ll need to be running at about 30% capacity but that still doesn’t overcome the issues of toilets, bars and foyers.”

Instead, Galbraith predicts that safety measures will happen before customers arrive at gigs. “We are going to have to overcome the same issues at airports, on aircrafts, and railways, and those measures — whether it be testing, tracking, or temperature testing — will be what I see opening our industry again.”

For festivals, Association of Independent Festivals CEO Paul Reed says that it’s “extremely difficult to see how festivals could operate” under social distancing conditions.

He continues: “Festivals have incredibly tight margins to begin with and costs such as infrastructure and artist fees are not going to adjust accordingly, which would immediately make it unfeasible to reduce capacity to allow for social distancing.

“It’s also questionable delivery on an operational level. Festivals are quite sprawling environments so it’s quite different to how you manage a venue and one room. Maintaining and monitoring those conditions around a festival site will be extremely challenging.”

“I think the only safe way for us to have these large scale events would be to have pop up testing stations.”

goc o’callaghan, arctangent festival

Goc O’Callaghan, who runs British rock festival ArcTanGent, points to the introduction of drug-testing at festivals as an example of the kind of health and safety rules that might make more sense.

“I think the only safe way for us to have these large scale events would be to have pop-up testing stations,” she says.

“So people are tested on their way into the festival site and anyone showing any signs of Covid-19 would be turned away and refunded their ticket in the interest of the safety of everybody else. Within the festival grounds, everyone would be tested.”

The extra safety measures will bring increased cost, which “further adds to the stress and financial complications of running an independent festival,” adds O’Callaghan. “I think we are going to be facing significantly higher costs in 2021.”

That extra financial burden adds to non-recoupable / ‘sunk’ costs for cancelled events, which the Association of Independent Festivals this week estimated has already reached an average of £375k per indie UK festival.

At the same time, the trade organisation predicts that the UK festival industry at large could be facing up to £800m in refund requests this year.

When the live industry’s calendar does return to normality, Primary Talent agent Matt Bates warns that over-saturation might result in another financial blow.

“You do worry that there will be another wave of casualty in the live music industry — you’re going to get to a stage where there is a lot happening but not enough people to go around to support it all.”

matt bates, primary talent 

“There are going to be so many events trying to happen because people haven’t been earning for the last few months, that you are going to hit saturation point,” he says.

“You do worry, especially when there’s less money going around, that there will be another wave of casualties in the live music industry because you’re going to get to a stage where there is a lot happening but not enough people to go around to support it all.

“It’s going to be a long road for everybody to start seeing recovery in the live music industry.”Music Business Worldwide

Stat Of The Week: People over 45, not Millennials, are driving music subscription growth in the UK

MBW’s Stat Of The Week is a new series in which we show why a single data point deserves the attention of the global music industry, and explain what it tells us about the future economics of the business.

“The audience that Spotify reaches is in many cases the 18-24 year olds – the same audience that doesn’t buy music.”

Daniel Ek, there, speaking in 2009, laying out the target demographic for the launch phase of his now world-famous music service.

Ever since Spotify arrived in Europe in 2008 – then in the US in 2011 – the predominant audience for most music streaming brands (and the focus of their advertising) has been people under 35.

Indeed, Spotify’s own data in Q1 2018 showed that 62% of its audience were ‘Millennials’, defined as those aged between 25 and 34 – a stat which didn’t even include those aged 24 or younger.

Millennials, in Spotify’s words, “stream on repeat more than they stream on random”, which helps explain why the record business itself continues to obsess over this demographic. (Repeat plays are obviously a valuable commodity for labels whose goal is market share gain and/or chart success.)

Yet the music business has some serious thinking to do about its youth-fixated strategy.

Official industry data, released this week by IFPI, showed that annual growth in global streaming income at labels started slowing last year – down from $2.7bn in 2018 to $2.2bn in 2019.

Now, a $2.2bn yearly gain in any format is hardly cause for major concern. But it does beg the question: as fiscal increases from mature streaming markets begin to slow, where is the bulk of the industry’s monetary growth in the future going to come from?

Some would argue it will mainly happen in so-called ’emerging markets’, like India or China – and, despite some clear challenges for the industry on this mission, the potential of these and other key non Anglo-American territories remains exciting.

But perhaps, in already ‘developed’ music markets like the United States and the United Kingdom, the record industry is at risk of missing out on a golden opportunity… if it doesn’t start making a play for the boomers.

MBW’s Stat Of The Week: 60% of new UK music streaming subscribers in the year to end of February 2020 were over 45 years old.

New research from the Entertainment Retailers Association (ERA) published this week has revealed that over 55-year-olds are the fastest growing group of music streaming subscribers in the UK. Widen that group to those over 45 years old and the trend gets even more pronounced.

According to ERA – whose members include the likes of Spotify, SoundCloud, Amazon, Deezer and YouTube – there were approximately 18.15m paying UK subscribers to music streaming services at the end of February 2020.

This figure was up by 2.835m on the equivalent number from the same period of the prior year (February 2019).

For the past six-and-a-half years, ERA has conducted a consumer tracking study, in which it has quizzes a panel of approximately 2,000 UK consumers about their entertainment consumption habits every quarter.

The org has overlaid its latest findings from this study with its wider market estimates to suggest what the age breakdown of Britain’s streaming consumer base looks like today.

Here’s that picture.

A few things immediately jump out here:

  • Between them, people aged 45 and above (inc over 55s) comfortably added more music subscriptions to the UK industry’s tally (+1.695m) in the past year than everyone 44 and under combined (+1.14m);
  • According to previously published ERA stats, UK calendar year spending on music streaming subscriptions in 2019 reached £1.003bn ($1.28bn), up £190.9m on the prior year (£812m). ERA’s latest data suggests that 60% of this growth came from people 45 or over, and that 72% came from people 35 or over;
  • The 18.15m subscribers counted in February 2020 make up around 27% of the total UK population. This suggests, streaming market-wise, the UK is a little more mature than the USA: the latest RIAA data shows that the average number of paying subscribers in the States across the 12 months of last year was 60.4m, which works out at approximately 18% of the total US population. Will the States therefore see a similar demographic shift on streaming in the years to come?

Right now, with 58% of all UK subscriptions, Millennials and Gen Z (people 34 and younger) remain the most lucrative age group for the UK music business in streaming terms. Everyone else (people 35 and older) claimed a 42% share of subscriptions in February 2020.

This will all change, however, if the trend seen in the past year continues into the future.

Look what would happen to the UK streaming subscriptions market if the exact same growth seen in ERA’s February 2020 stats (i.e. a 2.835m annual subs gain, with the majority amongst older consumers) plays out again over the next two years:

In this projection, by Q1 2022, there would almost be as many UK people over 35 paying for music streaming subscriptions (49%) as there were under 35 (51%).

There’s no certainty that this outcome will happen in 2021 and 2022, of course, although ERA itself concludes from its recent research that “as [UK streaming] penetration begins to plateau in the younger age groups, the growth rate is accelerating in the older age groups”.

ERA CEO Kim Bayley adds: “Over-55 year olds are the new battleground in the streaming market. Previously streaming services have very much been regarded as something for music’s traditional younger fanbase. These numbers show that 24/7 access to all the music you could wish for is also attractive to older music fans.”

Question is, if over 35s do start to become the dominant age segment on streaming services – aka the people paying the most money each month to the record business – how will the blockbuster music industry, now so accustomed to directing its marketing firepower towards the youth vote, respond?

Will catalog acts like The Beatles and Queen (pictured) – already the world’s No.10 and No.5 biggest revenue-generating artists of last year, respectively – earn a heavier presence on services such as Spotify? And will the value of their catalogs (and the possibility of big money exclusive deals being struck for them) therefore increase exponentially?

Will certain streaming platforms, arguably better attuned to a non-Millennial/Gen Z audience – like Amazon Music – quickly gain market share in their pursuit of older customers?

And, if paid streams are more heavily weighted than free streams, how will the weekly charts evolve when the majority of people shelling out for streaming accounts are old enough to remember Nirvana on MTV Unplugged?Music Business Worldwide

#saveourvenues fundraiser for grassroots UK music venues passes £1m

Following the launch of its #saveourvenues campaign in the UK last week, the Music Venue Trust (MVT) charity has revealed that donations have already passed £1 million (approximately $1.24m).

Instigated in response to the continued economic threat to over 500 grassroots music venues throughout the UK, #saveourvenues is aimed at artists, music fans and the wider music industry, with a plea for music companies in particular to contribute donations to the #saveourvenues fund.

The milestone follows “six figure pledges” from Beggars Group, Amazon Music/The BPI, The Mayor of London and “very substantial donations” from several other companies including Sony Music SJM, Kilimanjaro Live and DHP.

At the time of writing, the Crowfunder campaign has seen over 9,900 supporters donate over £1.2m ($1.5m).

Crowdfunder is covering all of the campaign’s platform and transaction fees, meaning that all monies raised will go towards supporting music venues.

To date, #saveourvenues has seen venues launch individual crowdfunder pages linked to the campaign with artists raising money for individual venues in crisis with whom they have a personal connection.

Artists are also being asked to support the #saveourvenues initiative via their social media platforms using the #saveourvenues hashtag and directing their fans to shows they are performing as part of this initiative and signposting the way to the www.saveourvenues.co.uk website where donations can be made.

“We fully support this campaign. Live music in small venues is where it all starts for most of our artists, and many of our best times are spent in them.”

Martin Mills, Beggars Group

Martin Mills, Founder and Chairman of Beggars Group, said: “We fully support this campaign. Live music in small venues is where it all starts for most of our artists, and many of our best times are spent in them.

“Whether it’s White Stripes at the Dome, Dry Cleaning at the Lexington or Adele (and Aldous Harding) above a pub in Islington, we need these places to survive and thrive. We miss them.”

“It’s been great to see many in the music community come together for the #saveourvenues campaign to help protect and save grassroots music venues across the UK.”

Paul Firth, Amazon Music Europe

Paul Firth, Director of Amazon Music Europe, said: “The UK live music industry is incredibly special and a key part of British music culture and in uncertain times like these it’s been great to see many in the music community come together for the #saveourvenues campaign to help protect and save grassroots music venues across the UK.”

“These industries are so important to the fabric of our city during the day and night, and they will play a key role in helping us to recover from this public health crisis.”

Sadiq Khan

The Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, added: “The coronavirus outbreak is having a significant impact on every aspect of life in London, and that includes our culture, creative industries and night time economy.

“These industries are so important to the fabric of our city during the day and night, and they will play a key role in helping us to recover from this public health crisis.

“I’m pleased to be working together with Music Venue Trust, the LGBTQ+ Venues Forum, the Creative Land Trust and the BFI to offer this emergency funding to those areas most at need, but we need the Government to step forward and provide the comprehensive support this industry needs to protect its future.”

“This is a great start but there is still so much more to do, and we dare not get complacent. We urgently need the music industry to help us so please get in touch if you can support this campaign.”

Mark Davyd

Mark Davyd said: “We cannot begin to say how grateful we are to Beggars Group, Amazon Music/The BPI, The Mayor of London, Sony Music, SJM, Kilimajaro Live, DHP and others for stepping up and helping us with the #saveourvenues campaign.

“These are critical times for over 500 grassroots music venues many of whom simply won’t survive this crisis without donations from the music industry and music fans.

“This is a great start but there is still so much more to do, and we dare not get complacent. We urgently need the music industry to help us so please get in touch if you can support this campaign.”Music Business Worldwide

UK’s Tileyard to expand in London, with plans to enter the US market

Tileyard London, based in the city’s Kings Cross area, is a central pillar of the UK music industry. Some 250 companies – including the likes of Believe, Platoon, Beats 1, Maverick and Empire – have based their UK HQs within the development, which hosts a range of offices, studios and other amenities.

Having recently announced a second UK site in the North of England, due to open next year, Tileyard is now looking at more than doubling the footprint of its original London site (mock-up, pictured) as well as eyeing expansion into the US and Far East.

The double-pronged UK expansion involves an investment of over £40 million and is expected to bring over 2,000 new jobs to the sites in London and Wakefield.

Tileyard’s current London site spans approximately 150,000 square feet, welcoming around 1,500 people each day.

Meanwhile, Tileyard’s management team have already scoped out potential locations in the US (with all major music cities under consideration) whilst also planning a move into Singapore.

Tileyard co-founder, Nick Keynes, said: “We are absolutely delighted to be expanding Tileyard both here in London and with our new site (Tileyard North) in Wakefield. Now more than ever it’s vital the creative industries have a home, a community, world class facilities to return to and active investment.

“We’re also in conversations on potential new sites both in the USA and Asia. It’s an incredible feeling to have cities reaching out to us asking to replicate what we’ve built here in London. They, like us, are aware of the power these creative communities can yield as well as the job creation they generate. We’re very excited to see what the coming months and years bring for Tileyard, both here in the UK and internationally.”

“We’re very excited to see what the coming months and years bring for Tileyard, both here in the UK and internationally.”

Nick Keynes, Tileyard

He added: “What started as an idea nine years ago has bloomed into a thriving community housing some of the most innovative companies in the world and I am excited to bring this creative gem to other locations to help creative communities thrive all over the world. Our decision to make further investment and the local authorities decision to allow this should be a clear sign of the value of Tileyard”

Paul Kempe, Tileyard Owner & Co-founder, added: “We’re investing over £40 million already just in the expansions here in the UK but the value we are adding to the creative industries globally and the local areas providing these world class facilities is worth so much more. I am incredibly proud to see Europe’s largest creative community, Tileyard, continue to grow and am passionate about continuing to grow the brand globally ”

Located in Kings Cross, London Tileyard is Europe’s largest community of artists, studios and businesses, all revolving around music, ideas, collaboration and creativity.Music Business Worldwide

Global recorded music industry revenues topped $20bn last year – but streaming growth slowed

The global recorded music industry generated $20.2bn in wholesale revenues – that’s the money making its way back to labels and artists – in 2019.

This figure was up 8.2% on the prior year ($18.7bn), according to official industry data revealed in the latest IFPI Global Music Report today (May 4).

Bright spots for record companies in 2019 included a softening of physical music revenue declines – down by just 5.3% year-on-year to $4.4bn.

This physical fall was more than offset by growth in streaming formats (including video and audio), which generated $11.4bn last year, up 22.9% YoY.

Money generated by streaming accounted for more than half (56.1%) of all global recorded music revenues.

The number of paid streaming accounts globally rose to 341 million, up 33.5% year-on-year (i.e. up 86m from 255m in 2019).

Previous IFPI reports have suggested that the number of users of paid-for subscription services grew from 176m in 2017 to 255m in 2018 – a jump of 79m.

However, digging more into IFPI’s 2019 data shows – as long predicted – some early signs of caution for the record business.

The industry’s total worldwide annual streaming revenue haul ($11.4bn) in 2019 was up by $2.2bn on the same figure from 2018 ($9.2bn), which in turn was up by $2.7bn on 2017 ($6.5bn).

This tells us that annual growth in overall streaming revenues (across audio/video and ad-supported/paid) slowed in 2019, down by $500m on the prior year.

Growth in overall record industry revenues (across streaming, physical, download, sync etc.) also slowed year-on-year: in 2018, this figure was up by $1.7bn (to $18.7bn); in 2019, it was up by $1.5bn (to $20.2bn).

The IFPI hasn’t today delivered a specific paid streaming revenue figure to media, but we can figure it out: the org’s data shows that 42% of the $20.2bn industry total last year came from paid subscriptions – equating to circa $8.48bn.

Using this figure ($8.48bn), we can ascertain that the average paid music streaming subscriber globally in 2019 (341m) paid $24.87 a year, or $2.07 per month, for their account.

The industry’s global paid streaming revenue haul was up 24.1% year-on-year, says IFPI – suggesting that it grew from approximately $6.83bn in 2018 to $8.48bn in 2019.

We can therefore use this number to estimate that the average music streaming subscriber in 2018 ($6.83bn / 255m subs) was paying $26.78 a year, or $2.23 per month.

(Further YoY paid streaming analysis is rendered difficult as the IFPI has revised much of its historical annual data in its latest report – meaning we can’t just flick back to prior reports and make simple comparisons.)

Frances Moore, chief executive of IFPI, said: “The Global Music Report we issued today covers results for 2019 and reflects the successful work and investment of music creators – from record companies to artists and beyond. Importantly, the strong foundation we built over the past several years helped deliver growth in 2019.

“While the numbers we are reporting are a snapshot of the business last year, the COVID-19 pandemic presents challenges unimaginable just months ago.

“In the face of a global tragedy, the music community has united behind efforts to support those affected. This is a critical and ongoing priority as our member record companies work to continue to support the careers of artists, musicians and employees around the world.”

As regards the money coming through the door, IFPI says that Latin America was the world’s fastest-growing region in percentage terms in 2019, up 18.9%.

Within LATAM, Brazil grew by 13.1%, Mexico by 17.1% and Argentina by 40.9%.

Europe, the world’s second-largest region, grew 7.2% – after being almost flat in 2018 – with UK (+7.2%), Germany (+5.1%), Italy (+8.2%) and Spain (+16.3%) all reporting strong growth.

The world’s biggest recorded music market in 2019 was the USA, followed by (in order) Japan, the UK, Germany, France, South Korea and China.

As previously reported, the biggest revenue-generating artist of the year, globally, was Taylor Swift (pictured).

The biggest album was 5×20 All the BEST!! 1999-2019 by Japan’s ARASHI, followed by Swift’s Lover.

The biggest single was Billie Eilish’s Bad Guy, followed by Lil Nas X’s Old Town Road.Music Business Worldwide

Rich Castillo joins Atlantic Records UK as A&R Director

Atlantic Records UK has hired Rich Castillo as A&R Director.

He will report into label Co-Presidents, Briony Turner and Ed Howard.

Castillo joins Atlantic from Sony/ATV Music Publishing, where he held the position of Senior Director of A&R.

During his time there, he helped revamp the A&R department and signed the likes of Neave Applebaum, Pa Salieu, TMS, and Wayne Hector.

The new hire marks the second senior appointment made by Howard and Turner since they became Co-Presidents of Atlantic UK at the end of last year.

Castillo joins Liz Goodwin, who was announced as the label’s new General Manager last month.

Castillo started his career at the management company Shalit Global, where he helped launch and develop the multi-platinum, award-winning group N-Dubz.

In 2012, he joined UMTV and All Around the World in an A&R role, signing N-Dubz stars Dappy and Tulisa to solo deals – yielding No.1 records with Dappy’s No Regrets and Tulisa’s Young.

He also signed HRVY and Young Adz, when the latter was just 14 years old, and enjoyed a top 10 single with Charlie Brown’s On My Way.

Castillo then moved to Universal Music Canada in 2014, where he served as an A&R Director for two years, landing a Juno Award for Best Dance Song with Bit Funk’s Off the Ground.

In 2016, he returned to the UK to join Polydor Records and take on the role of Senior A&R Manager. While there, he signed Stefflon Don and had a number of hits, including the global smash Hurtin’ Me.

He also signed Big Heath, Blanco, and Mic Lowry, and A&R’d the latest album from Wretch 32.

“Rich has great ears and a brilliant track record for finding and creating massive pop hits.”

Briony Turner 

Briony Turner said: “Rich has great ears and a brilliant track record for finding and creating massive pop hits.

“His experience and energy will make him a welcome addition to the A&R team. We’re looking forward to all the amazing music and incredible artists that we know he’ll be bringing into the fold.”

“The talent within the building and across our roster will keep us at the forefront of the industry, and we’re incredibly excited for the future.”

Ed Howard

Ed Howard added: “Rich is the latest in a series of senior hires that we’re making, and combined with our already outstanding team, this puts us in a great position to continue to discover future stars and deliver world-class service to our artists.

“The talent within the building and across our roster will keep us at the forefront of the industry, and we’re incredibly excited for the future.”

“Joining Ed and Briony’s team was something I just couldn’t turn down.”

Rich Castillo

Rich Castillo said: “Atlantic Records has been the number one label for breaking domestic talent in the UK for as long as I’ve been in the business.

“Joining Ed and Briony’s team was something I just couldn’t turn down. Tony Harlow has been very clear about his ambitions for the company, and it’s an absolute privilege to be a part of it.”Music Business Worldwide

PPL to make advance distribution payment of $29.7m in April

British music licensing company PPL has amended its annual payment schedule in order to bring forward part of its June distribution to support its members during the COVID-19 crisis.

On April 30, 2020, PPL will make an advance payment of £23.9 million (approximately $29.7m) to more than 15,000 performers and recording rightsholders.

They are set to receive payment either as direct members of PPL or indirectly through other collective management organizations.

“This action is being taken to further support members during the COVID-19 pandemic,” states PPL in a press release, which adds that “the payment will bridge the gap between payments made in March and June as part of PPL’s annual distribution schedule”.

The news of the advance distribution follows the organization’s recent quarterly payment to 26,000 to performers and recording rightsholders of £87.6 million on March 31.

PPL recently pledged £700,000 to the emergency hardship funds being administered by Help Musicians, the Musicians’ Union and AIM.

It also contributed to a pan-industry fund set up by record labels association, the BPI, which saw an additional £1.5m being made available to the Help Musicians Coronavirus Financial Hardship Fund and other channels for supporting musicians.

“PPL’s collections are an important revenue stream to tens of thousands of performers and recording rightsholders, both in the UK and around the world.”

Peter Leathem, PPL 

PPL Chief Executive Officer Peter Leathem (pictured), said: “PPL’s collections are an important revenue stream to tens of thousands of performers and recording rightsholders, both in the UK and around the world.

“In these difficult times, it is important that PPL is paying members even more regularly than usual.

“In addition to our March distribution of £87.6 million and our recent financial pledges to industry hardship funds, bringing forward part of the annual June payment to the end of April will provide further meaningful support for those in need.

“I want to thank PPL’s staff for their tireless efforts in making this payment happen. It has involved a large amount of additional work; however we felt it was entirely appropriate to take these steps given the importance of cash flow to our members at this time.”

 Music Business Worldwide

Dean Gillard named EVP of Oliver Heldens’ Heldeep Records

Dean Gillard has been appointed EVP of Heldeep Records, the electronic house record label owned by DJ/producer Oliver Heldens.

Heldeep Records is led by Heldens’ management company, Milk & Honey, and is based within the firm’s new UK offices in Kings Cross, London.

Gillard comes to Heldeep from Universal Music Group where he was Vice President, International Marketing and A&R for Universal Music’s global dance network, PM:AM Recordings.

At Universal, Gillard (pictured) worked on global releases for Tiesto, Avicii, Jonas Blue, Meduza, Jax Jones, Martin Solveig and Axwell Ingrosso amongst others.

His newly-formed Nocturn Music Group will now join Heldens and Milk & Honey, with the aim of “transforming Heldeep Records from a startup into a mainstay electronic label brand”.

Gillard will work closely with Alex Harrow & Dave Frank who are co-heads of electronic music for Milk & Honey Management.

Oliver Heldens. said: “I’m very happy having someone with so much experience in the label business like Dean strengthen the Heldeep team. He’s also a really nice person with the right mindset, so I think we’ll have a great future together.”

“In the coming years, Heldeep will become one of the top destinations for the best dance records throughout the UK and Europe, and onward to the global presence we plan to build while maintaining the great integrity of Oliver Heldens and his brand.”

Lucas Keller, Milk & Honey

Lucas Keller, founder and President of Milk & Honey, said: “I couldn’t be more excited to have Dean on the team. In the coming years, Heldeep will become one of the top destinations for the best dance records throughout the UK and Europe, and onward to the global presence we plan to build while maintaining the great integrity of Oliver Heldens and his brand. There is not a stronger fit than Dean Gillard to take that torch. Looking forward.”

Added Dean Gillard: “I’m very happy to be working with Oliver and the Milk & Honey crew, making Heldeep one of the first clients on the books at Nocturn Music Group. Heldeep is in great shape with huge potential to expand even more globally. I’m looking forward to creating exciting future partnerships with the label.”

Alex Harrow, Co-Head of Electronic Music at Milk & Honey said: “We are incredibly excited to have Dean Gillard involved at Heldeep Records. He will provide the foundation and guidance needed to grow the Heldeep label into an even bigger force in the dance music industry than it already is. The label has accomplished a lot in its 5 short years in existence and now with Dean at the helm we feel that the sky is the limit.”

And Dave Frank, Co-Head of Electronic Music at Milk & Honey, said: “I first worked with Dean back in 2013 while he was overseeing PM:AM Recordings for Universal Music Group, and was immediately struck by his forward thinking approaches to both A&R and marketing. He is one of the best record men in the space, and we are excited to collaborate with him to continue breaking records and acts on a global scale.”

Lucas Keller founded Milk & Honey six years ago and has since opened offices in Los Angeles, New York, Nashville and now London.

Milk & Honey, with approximately 60 clients, claims to be the fastest-growing songwriter/producer management company in the world. The company’s roster has collectively sold over 400 million records worldwide.

The first signings with the opening of Milk & Honey UK are producer artist Stuart Price, best known for his hits with The Killers and Madonna, and songwriter Andrew Jackson who has worked with Dua Lipa, Eminem, Kygo, Alicia Keys and Hailee Steinfeld (amongst others).

Milk & Honey Management has also signed M22, the British-German DJ and producer duo consisting of Matt James and Frank Sanders and look forward to expanding their roster in 2020 and beyond.Music Business Worldwide

Music Venue Trust Launches #saveourvenues campaign in support of over 500 grassroots UK music venues

The UK’s Music Venue Trust (MVT) has launched a new campaign called #saveourvenues, in response to the continued economic threat to over 500 grassroots music venues throughout the UK.

Following on from the launch of their Grassroots Music Venues (GMV) Crisis fund last month, #saveourvenues is aimed at artists, music fans and the wider music industry and aims to raise both money and awareness.

To date, the GMV Crisis Fund has raised over £182,000 thanks to donations from Amazon Music, SJM, a number of high-profile artists and music fans throughout the UK.

From today (April 27), The GMV Crisis Fund will be re-named the #saveourvenues fund and will form part of a wider initiative that will see artists raising money for individual venues with whom they have a personal connection.

Artists are being encouraged to choose a venue that is currently in crisis from an interactive map and dropdown menu, which can be found on the campaign website at www.saveourvenues.co.uk.

Those artists will then be given the tools and guidance to perform an ‘at home’ gig in support of that particular venue.

Each venue will have their own crowd funding page with a clear target of the funds it needs to raise to stay afloat throughout this difficult period.

Once a target is reached any excess revenue will go to the central #saveourvenues fund to help the wider grassroots music venue community.

Artists are also being asked to support the #saveourvenues initiative via their social media platforms using the #saveourvenues hashtag and directing their fans to shows they are performing as part of this initiative and signposting the way to the www.saveourvenues.co.uk website where donations can be made.

Music fans are encouraged to show their support by engaging with the #saveourvenues shows and donating to their local venue’s crowd funding pages but can also choose to donate directly to the main #saveourvenues fund via the campaign website.

The wider music industry is also being encouraged to donate to the main #saveourvenues fund and those wishing to donate in excess of £1,000 are asked to contact Music Venue Trust founder and CEO Mark Davyd directly on mark@musicvenuetrust.co.uk

“We have received some magnificent support so far from music companies, but we need a lot more to step up and help save this essential part of the music eco-system.”

Mark Davyd, Music Venue Trust

One of the main drivers of this initiative is Frank Turner whose recent series of ‘Independent Venue Love’ shows, (which took place at different times to provide access for both European and North American audiences) for local venues Nambucca (London), The Joiners (Southampton) the Railway Inn (Winchester) and The Forum (Tunbridge Wells), raised thousands of pounds and provided a major inspiration for this campaign.

Frank Turner said: “The UK live music industry is staring into the abyss right now. I’m not able to save the whole thing on my own, but I decided to do a series of livestream shows to raise money for specific independent venues that I know and love, and that are in serious risk of disappearing right now.

“The success of these shows demonstrated the love that exists between music fans and their favourite grassroots music venues so the #saveourvenues campaign is a brilliant way of building on that and hopefully giving artists and music fans a chance to get involved and play a big part in helping them survive.”

One venue rescued from closure by Frank Turner’s recent efforts is the Tunbridge Wells Forum.

Co-founder of the Tunbridge Wells Forum, Jason Dormon, added: “Frank Turner has always championed the grassroots sector, having grown up and learnt his craft in these venues.

“His generosity and commitment is truly admirable; he inspires live music fans to come together and unite in raising awareness and funds for the UK’s grassroots music venues. We were totally overwhelmed and heartened by Frank’s help and the support and generosity of the local community.”

Currently 556 venues are at risk including The Sugarmill in Stoke-on-Trent. Danni Brownsill, the venue’s chief booker and promoter, said: “We’re extremely proud to be a grassroots music venue.

“These spaces are pipelines for talent and absolute lifelines for the communities they serve and the talents therein. We cannot allow them to be consigned to the past. UK music culture as we know it will simply not exist without these spaces, so it is vital to protect them.”

Mark Davyd said: “Frank Turner’s amazing initiative proved that together artists and music fans can go a long way to helping at-risk grassroots music venues get through this period of lockdown.

“We are building on his good work with the #saveourvenues campaign and are confident that we can help create real momentum that will see artists and venues working together to raise much needed funds.

“We are also calling on the wider music industry to support us too. We have received some magnificent support so far from music companies, but we need a lot more to step up and help save this essential part of the music eco-system.

“We cannot stress enough how critical it is that the music industry supports the #saveourvenues campaign as without them over 500 of the UK’s grassroots music venues could go out of business, never to return, in the coming months. Please help us.”Music Business Worldwide

Sarah Pickering and Chris Jones promoted to Co-Heads of sync team at Sony/ATV Music Publishing UK

Sony/ATV Music Publishing’s UK division has promoted Sarah Pickering, aka Pixie, to Vice President, Creative and Chris Jones to Vice President, Licensing and named them Co-Heads of its sync team.

They will report directly to Sony/ATV UK Co-Managing Directors David Ventura and Tim Major.

As Vice President, Creative, Pickering will be responsible for implementing creative strategies for Sony/ATV UK’s sync division across all media.

Additionally, she will maintain and develop relationships with clients and songwriters, and work with them to create new sync opportunities.

In his new role as Vice President, Licensing, Jones will lead Sony/ATV UK’s licensing strategy and set the agenda for pricing and negotiation for its synch business.

The two executives will be supported by Nick Oakes, who will be taking on the newly created role of Director, UK Synch.

“With Pixie and Chris at the helm, we are even more confident that Sony/ATV can offer the most innovative, creative and competitive opportunities for our songwriters and clients.”

David Ventura and Tim Major, Sony/ATV

Pickering launched her music business career at ITV Yorkshire in 2004, and she later became a music consultant at EMI Production Music in 2009.

When Sony/ATV merged with EMI in 2012, she moved to London to manage Sony/ATV’s production music sales team.

In her most recent position as Head of Creative Supervision and Catalogue Synch, Pickering was responsible for liaising with television, advertising, brand and film companies across the UK and forming relationships with clients and songwriters.

Jones began his music industry career in 2004 when he joined EMI Music Publishing as a Synch & Licensing Assistant.

He was later promoted to Senior Licensing Manager in 2011 and transferred to Sony/ATV when it merged with EMI in 2012.

In 2013, Jones was promoted to Head of Synch & Licensing at Sony/ATV, where he co-led the UK’s newly combined synch team, developed new licensing processes, and advised on sync deals across media forms.

Sony/ATV UK Co-Managing Directors David Ventura and Tim Major, said: “It’s important that we remain close to our songwriters in every area of business and that we establish and protect value in their art.

“With Pixie and Chris at the helm, we are even more confident that Sony/ATV can offer the most innovative, creative and competitive opportunities for our songwriters and clients, and that we are fully equipped to continue our great success in this ever-changing marketplace.

“We are delighted for them both, and can’t wait to see what they, and the incredibly talented synch team they now lead, can achieve together.”

“Their combined experience and successful track records in creative and licensing are unparalleled.”

Brian Monaco, Sony/ATV

Sony/ATV President, Global Chief Marketing Officer Brian Monaco added: “I have had the privilege of working with Pixie since 2012 and Chris since 2007 – their combined experience and successful track records in creative and licensing are unparalleled.

“As synch continues to be an extremely important and flourishing aspect of Sony/ATV’s business, I couldn’t be happier to have Pixie and Chris leading the charge in the UK.”

“We want to ensure that the Sony/ATV catalogue flourishes, and I look forward to working with our brilliant songwriters to create exciting, innovative synch opportunities.”

Sarah Pickering

Pickering said: “It is an absolute honour to co-head such a talented and dynamic UK synch team with Chris, and I can’t wait to build upon the success that they have already achieved.

“We want to ensure that the Sony/ATV catalogue flourishes, and I look forward to working with our brilliant songwriters to create exciting, innovative synch opportunities.”

“Together, with our exceptional team, we will work to create new opportunities and deliver the best service for our songwriters.”

Chris Jones

Jones added: “I am thrilled to have this opportunity to co-head the UK synch team alongside Pixie, and I’m proud to lead the UK’s licensing strategy for the incredible Sony/ATV catalogue.

“Together, with our exceptional team, we will work to create new opportunities and deliver the best service for our songwriters.”

 Music Business Worldwide

Spirit Music Group signs Dua Lipa collaborator Nick Gale

Spirit Music Group has signed a worldwide publishing deal with British songwriter and producer, Nick Gale, professionally known as Digital Farm Animals.

The multi-platinum songwriter/producer has worked with artists such as Dua Lipa, Aitch, Rita Ora, Galantis, Louis Tomlinson and Bebe Rexha.

Gale worked on Dua Lipa’s breakthrough single Be The One, which landed a Top 10 in the UK.

Gale also penned Galantis’ Top 5 single No Money, which accumulated over half a billion Spotify streams and became their first single to chart on the Hot 100 in the US.

Other recent successes include UK rapper Aitch’s Top 10 single Buss Down featuring ZieZie; Rita Ora’s Anywhere which charted Top 10 in 15 countries, peaking at No.2 in the UK; and Louis Tomlinson’s multi-platinum selling hit single to Back To You featuring Bebe Rexha and Digital Farm Animals.

Other successes by Nick Gale include releases with James Arthur, Anne-Marie, Hailee Steinfeld, Jason Derulo, Cheat Codes, Alan Walker, Becky G, Noah Cyrus, Sigala, Nelly, and Jonas Blue.

“There is huge excitement across our entire company in welcoming the super-talented writer/producer Nick Gale to our roster.”

Rak Sanghvi, Spirit Music Group

“There is huge excitement across our entire company in welcoming the super-talented writer/producer Nick Gale to our roster,” said Rak Sanghvi, Global President, Spirit Music Group.

“Nick is without doubt a heavyweight talent whose achievements to date have been spectacular—he has a tremendous work ethic, a finely-tuned creative sensibility and impeccable management.

“I have no doubt that we will enjoy much further success together on a global level.”

“We couldn’t be more excited to be working with Nick and his manager Marc as Nick embarks on this next chapter of his career.”

Jordan Buck, Spirit Music Group

Jordan Buck, A&R Manager, Spirit Music Group, added: “Nick is one of the hardest working and most self-motivated writers in the industry. He consistently delivers and his track record speaks for itself.

“We couldn’t be more excited to be working with Nick and his manager Marc as Nick embarks on this next chapter of his career.”

“I really admire Rak and Jordan’s vision and their focus on quality and longevity.”

Nick Gale

Nick Gale/Digital Farm Animals, said: “I am delighted and incredibly excited to sign to the Spirit team.

“I really admire Rak and Jordan’s vision and their focus on quality and longevity. I can’t wait to get going and write some fu*king bangers.”

“We absolutely love Rak’s vision and as soon as we met the rest of the team we knew they had the same mentality we do.

Marc Fineman, FINE Group

Marc Fineman of FINE Group, said: “Nick and I are incredibly excited to work with Spirit Music Group.

“We absolutely love Rak’s vision and as soon as we met the rest of the team we knew they had the same mentality we do.

“With Jordan in the UK and incredible writers, producers and partners in every other key territory we are extremely confident we are going to have big success together for a long time to come.”

Pictured [Left-Right]:  Jordan Buck (A&R Manager, Spirit Music Group), Marc Fineman (FINE Group), Nick Gale, Rak Sanghvi (Global President, Spirit Music Group) and Andrew Scott (Administration Manger, Spirit Music Group).Music Business Worldwide

The A&R Awards will return… in March 2021

The A&R Awards, presented by MBW, have become a must-attend fixture in the British music industry’s annual calendar.

The UK-focused event has taken place in November of each of the past four years, and we were getting ready to announce this year’s show… until the ‘c’ word went and messed with our plans.

In light of the current pandemic, and with the disruption and misery it’s currently causing key elements of the music industry, we have decided to postpone this year’s awards until March 2021.

The A&R Awards is the most enjoyable night in the UK music industry calendar and it’s important to us that our next instalment lives up to that promise.

For that reason (and here’s where we ask you to get out your diary/smartphone/Filofax) we’re delighted to confirm that the next A&R Awards will now take place on the evening of Thursday, March 11, 2021, at the De Vere Grand Connaught Rooms in London.

Etch it into your calendars!

For the competitive types among you, please rest assured that all releases covering the entire span of the last year (from Q4 2019 through Q1 2021, in fact) will be considered for shortlists at the event.

The A&R Awards will now take place in March each year moving forward.

Full details of how to buy tickets for our 2021 event will be announced in the near future.

Until then, stay well, and we wish you all as swift (and safe) a return to normalcy as possible.Music Business Worldwide

Dream Life Records, headed by Dan Owusu, Lunick Bourgess and Shane Derozario, launched by Jason Iley at Sony Music UK

Jason Iley (Chairman and CEO, Sony Music UK & Ireland) has announced the launch of a new label, Dream Life Records, which will be run by three of the UK music industry’s rising stars, Dan Owusu, Lunick Bourgess and Shane Derozario.

According to Sony, the trio will “focus on finding urban and pop talent”, while “developing artists and management teams to the highest level, bridging the gap between youth and the mainstream”.

Between them Owusu, Bourgess and Derozario combine expertise across management, publishing and A&R.

“I want to continue building a company that is led by entrepreneurs and innovators. Dan, Lunick and Shane are extremely ambitious, hugely energetic and will be an excellent addition to the Sony team.”

Jason Iley, Sony Music UK

Dan Owusu started his music career at the Notting Hill Academy of Music, followed by BMG Publishing where he worked as A&R Manager, signing artists including Chip, AJ Tracey, MoStack, Lotto Boyzz and Hardy Caprio.

Lunick Bourgess fell in love with music during his childhood in the Congo and launched his own independent label while at university. He joined Virgin EMI as an A&R scout, was quickly promoted to A&R manager and signed a host of young talent including MoStack, Hardy Caprio, Tion Wayne and the platinum-selling drill artist, Russ. (Bourgess won the Trailblazer award at MBW’s UK-focused A&R Awards in 2018.)

Shane ‘Mizermilli’ Derozario started his own management company nine years ago and has worked with UK talent including K-Trap and MoStack, who credits Shane’s vision and dedication for much of his success, including a UK Top 5 album.

Jason Iley said: “I want to continue building a company that is led by entrepreneurs and innovators. Dan, Lunick and Shane are extremely ambitious, hugely energetic and will be an excellent addition to the Sony team. Their combination of nous and flair promises to uncover an exciting roster of new talent.”

“We decided to join Sony as we are all admirers of Jason because he gives young executives brilliant opportunities and mentors them through.”

Shane Derozario, Dream Life Records

Dan Owusu said: “Jason has a tremendous track record when it comes to identifying talent and staff. His intentions when it comes to diversity are clear and this is notable when you look at each label and the label heads. We appreciate Jason for his belief and support in our vision.”

Lunick Bourgess said: “I love how Sony operates and the diverse executives the company hires. I truly think it’s a forward-thinking company in tune with today’s generation. We are excited to work with Jason, under his leadership and guidance we can really thrive as young music executives.”

Shane Derozario said: “We decided to join Sony as we are all admirers of Jason because he gives young executives brilliant opportunities and mentors them through. We are hungry and ready to start.”Music Business Worldwide

Trio Mandili – Apareka lyrics

Zetsas shakheneo ap’arek’av,
Mtvare datvisjvrisk’en it’oleba,
Kalav shav tvalt raad map’arebav,
Anamts ch’erkhoshi rad miqolebav?!
Dghes me shen sts’orperi viknebio,
Ghame gavit’anat saubarit.
Kalav, nu amiri pikrebio,
Mamshord gaigone naubari!
Mamshord gaigone naubari!
Zetsa uk’etsia varsk’vlavt pardas,
Mtvarets gats’eula datvisjvrisk’en,
Vazhav, sad ts’akhvedi, aghar schankhar,
Net’av, shen sts’orpersamts damitsdide.
Ghame ut’ekhia mat saubars,
Dila gatenebul namiani,
Rizhrazhs arqiani botla uqvars,
Botla nach’relian-sasmliani,
Botla nach’relian-sasmliani.
Sts’orperm mout’ana botlit araq,
Dilam shuadghisk’en gaits’ia,
K’atsma qants’it sasmel gadatsala,
Mere eshmak’urad chaitsina.
Kalma luk’ma mistsa tav dakhara,
K’idev erti stkvio khevsurisa,
Sasmelm k’atsis goni gadapara,
Tanats is sts’orperi gverds uzis da,
Tanats is sts’orperi gverds uzis da.

“Raebs vazrob ghmertma mariskhas da…”
Shertskhva, gadaek’ra sakhadis per,
Nela gadavida datvisjvars da,
Bilik’s gadauqva khakhmat’isk’en.

Ezhel – Şehrimin Tadı lyrics

[Verse 1]
Ankara ayazı ruhumu keser
Bi’ cebimde yok kapital
Bi’ cebimde kenevir tohumu
Ayrancı, Cebeci, Kennedy yokuşu
Kaybettim gene şu yolumu
Kafam taşak gibi karnımız aç!
N’apsak şimdi? Süper marketten çalsak bi’ şey;
Sosis ve salam!
Yerim, kafam düşer tekrar, tekrar ot ister canım
Ah, polisten kaçın! (Bugy)
Rap’in pavyonunda olurum Çubuklu Yaşar
Manita tutulur bana, onu da öpmemem lüzumsuz kaçar
Atar atar gider, bebeler bebeler
Takılır gecelerde, maymunluk yapar
Gözü kızıl, gözü kara bebek
Çözüp durdum, çözüm para demek
O da bana ve de sana gerek
Salak bebelerde karakter eksik
Daha hanginizi adam edek?
Yanaşır yılışık bahane seks
Soyup soyar seni atar eve
Yanında viski ve vodka ve afgan var hepsinin tadı nefis

[Hook]
Karanlık çöktüğünde koktuğunda kömür sokak
Şehrimin tadı ağzımda yine; is, pas, kir, kömür, plastik, çöplük, lastik, egzoz, esrar
Karanlık çöktüğünde koktuğunda kömür sokak
Şehrimin tadı ağzımda yine; is, pas, kir, kömür, plastik, çöplük, lastik, egzoz, esrar
İs, pas, kir, kömür, plastik, çöplük, lastik, egzoz, esrar
İs, pas, kir, kömür, plastik, çöplük, lastik, egzoz, esrar
İs, pas, kir, kömür, plastik, çöplük, lastik, egzoz, esrar
İs, pas, kir, kömür

[Verse 2]
Tüm şehir bi’ pavyon ve bizim paramız yok
Şükür ki karnımız tok, şansımız çok olur elimiz floş
Sadece dirsekten aşağımız bronz
Kışımız soğuk olur, kırımız boz
Kızımız hoş olur, hızlıdır çok
Denizi var ama kıyısı yok
Kuyumu kaz, ister ki kuyruğuma bas
Kuyunuz kafama kuru, a basınız tuzunuz kuruda kurunuz yaş
Suçluluk duygunuz surata yansır, bırakın yansın
Kıralım kafa
Ben de sözde kralım la’, kralım lafta
İnceyi anla, İncek’i İncesu’dan ayıran sistemi sik’im
Hep size, hep size lan, biz de isteriz bi’ şey
Gençlerim işsiz de patronlar sizken sikeyim işi
Kendi patronum benim, takım elbisemse kapşonum, berem
Metropolerinde hapsolur gelen
Ghettolar evinse hep sonun beter
Ketum ol bebem
Duyarlar, işine sokarlar çomak
Çok ahkam kesenler çıkarlar korkak
Hiç emek vermeden çıkarlar ortak
Sen zannediyo’ken sigara ortak
Sonuna seni de tokatlar sokak
Konular sorunlar bok atmak kolay
Kokarken sokaklar düşersin boka
İs, pas, kir, kömürde yaşarsın boşa

[Hook]
Karanlık çöktüğünde koktuğunda kömür sokak
Şehrimin tadı ağzımda yine; is, pas, kir, kömür, plastik, çöplük, lastik, egzoz, esrar
Karanlık çöktüğünde koktuğunda kömür sokak
Şehrimin tadı ağzımda yine; is, pas, kir, kömür, plastik, çöplük, lastik, egzoz, esrar
İs, pas, kir, kömür, plastik, çöplük, lastik, egzoz, esrar
İs, pas, kir, kömür, plastik, çöplük, lastik, egzoz, esrar
İs, pas, kir, kömür, plastik, çöplük, lastik, egzoz, esrar
İs, pas, kir, kömür

“How” Vybz Kartel Roast Popcaan In New Song: Listen


Vybz Kartel quietly disses Popcaan on his new song “How” and barely anyone noticed.

This is the second song that Kartel released this week after dropping a new joint dedicated to his mother on Monday. Recently, the Gazanation deejay has been quietly taking shots his former protege Popcaan who he previously ousted as being a disloyal member of the Gaza over his alignment with Drake. In one of his recent songs, Kartel accused the Unruly Boss of stealing some of his styles and now on this new Dunwell Productions-produced single, he calls him bad mind.

“Judas by time you say a who that / Back fly go Cuba, wat time now Muller / Time fi you stop watch man give thanks for what you have / Red eye will blind yo or make man wine yo / How yo fi badmind yo friend wa the bloodclat do them… / Cut them off like Gillette / How yo fi badmind yo friend unni fi move and go weh / Give them a spinners with six shots Russian Roulette / Bout yo rate me yo no rate me talk yo a talk / But mi naan hear nutten just blah blah blah,” Vybz Kartel deejay over a dancehall beat.

In the lyrics, Kartel is saying that Popcaan badmind (envy) him for the things he achieved and then always talk about how much he rates (respect) Vybz Kartel, but now him Kartel stop listening to all of that and sees him for what he really is, badmind and disloyal.

During an interview back in July in the UK, Popcaan opened up about the hate that he has been getting from Vybz Kartel and the rest of the Gazanation fan base which makes up more than half the dancehall fans population in his opinion. Poppy also said that he learned from the hate that he has been experiencing and that is helping him stay on top.

“Since I’ve been around Vybz Kartel like a lot of people use to hate Vybz Kartel but he stayed on top and I learn that from him,” Popcaan explains. “That is why if Vybz Kartel hate Popcaan today I will forever be on top because I learn that from him.”

Listen Popcaan New Conscious Single “Family”


Popcaan drop a conscious new single titled “Family,” produced by Delly Ranx & PMGJA.

The track is featured on the new Cotton Swab Riddim and features Popcaan calling out some fake people around him. “Mi nuh know if heaven is real / But mi know fi a fact a no every man real / Some boi heart dutty not clean / Dem nuh want see a next yout livin’ in the hills / To every evil demon / Dem can’t stop mi nor Dre Island,” Popcaan deejay over the Cotton Swab dancehall beat.

Popcaan has a chance to create history this month by winning a third straight MOBO Award for Best Reggae Act in the UK. The Unruly Boss deejay won the award for the past two years, but this year he has stiff competition from the likes of Alkaline, Aidonia, Damian Marley, and Chronixx.

Yo Gotti – Around the World Lyrics

[Intro: Children Singing]
Lala la la lala la la la
Lala la la lala la la la
Lala la la lala la la la
Lala la la lala la la la

[Chorus: Children & Yo Gotti]
I been ’round the world
Reppin’ where I’m from (where I’m from)
Right back to my hood
Right back to the slums
Right back to my hood
Right back to my, where I’m from
Right back to the Crest
I been ’round the world
Reppin’ where I’m from (where I’m from)
Right back to my trap
Right back to my slums

[Verse 1: Yo Gotti]
I just left Dubai
I just left Hawai’i
I just left, I just left NY
Headed to M-I-A, hey
I just left the bank
Headed to LA
I just left all my dogs a plate
Put ’em on a plane
Passport, I just left UK
Hustlin’ out the States
I got weight
Yah they call it freight
Hood call it yay, yay
I can prolly say that I ain’t never took the stand
My lil, Asian bitch she do my feet she from Japan (ayy)

[Chorus: Yo Gotti & Children]
I been ’round the world
Reppin’ where I’m from (where I’m from)
Right back to my hood
Right back to the slums
Right back to my hood
Right back to my gun
Right back to the Crest
Right back to my bunk

[Verse 2: Yo Gotti]
Where you from Gotti (Gotti)
Why your hoes exotic (why)
Why your car foreign (skrt skrt)
What your jewelry doin’ [?]
What your fashion be
Bitch why you askin’ me (huh)
‘Cause you a drug dealer
Why you look like fashion week
This outfit a half a brick and they come from Milan
I can’t rock no skinnies, it won’t hold my gun
I got a Chinese bitch a Chinese Uzi
Say her favorite rapper Lil Uzi
Told her I’ma put her on to Lil Boosie
Introduce her to the gangsta music

[Chorus: Yo Gotti]
I been ’round the world
Rappers and their drug life
2Pac, Outlawz, yah this Thug Life

[Chorus: Yo Gotti & Children]
I been ’round the world
Reppin’ where I’m from (where I’m from)
Right back to my hood
Right back to the slums
Right back to my hood
Right back to my gun
Right back to the Crest
Right back to my bunk

[Outro: Yo Gotti & Children]
Lala la la lala la la la
Lala la la lala la la la
Lala la la lala la la la
Lala la la lala la la la
I been ’round the world
Reppin’ where I’m from (where I’m from)
Right back to my hood
Right back to the slums
Right back to my hood
Right back to my gun
Right back to the Crest
Right back to my bunk

Popcaan Drops New Song “Can’t Box” Shows Off Expensive Jewelry


Popcaan sends a clear message to his enemies in his new single “Nuh Bwoy Can’t Box.”

The Unruly Boss dropped the new gangsta anthem last night and took a moment to show off his pricey jewelry collection. The gritty single is featured on the Panic Riddim, produced by JAM 2 Records and DRE Swade. “If bwoy diss me in a day mi naan go kill them night / Same place deso him a loose him life / Bombohole head buss off like a f**king sprite, unruly / No pu**y cyan diss mi pon god earth, no / Unless me bloodclat hand naan work / Mi guns and mi killy them alert,” Popcaan spits.

Popcaan also took the opportunity to show off his expensive watches and chains including a massive Unruly chain. Poppy has been having a great year and has a chance to make history at next month’s MOBO Awards in the UK if wins. The “Party Shot” deejay is going up against artists like Damian “Jr. Gong” Marley, Aidonia, Chronixx, and his arch nemesis Alkaline. Popcaan won the MOBO award for Best Reggae Act for the past two years and this year could be his third straight year.

#popcaan showing off his jewelry collection

A post shared by DancehallHipHop (@dancehallhiphop) on Oct 20, 2017 at 4:56pm PDT

Alkaline Is As Big As Popcaan Internationally Says Producer Lee Milla

Is Alkaline as big as Popcaan on the international scene? Dancehall producer Lee Milla thinks so.

Since breaking onto the scene, Alkaline has had a big rivalry with former Gaza prefect Popcaan, and this year that beef reached an all-time high with diss tracks coming from both sides. Both artists are arguably among the top five deejays in dancehall currently, so the argument is who is bigger internationally. This debate is going on right now and while fans of both sides think that their artist has the edges.

Lee Milla, who has produced songs for Vybz Kartel, is now producing songs for Alkaline, Mavado and Jahmiel. The beat maker thinks that the Vendetta boss is definitely as big as Popcaan globally. Speaking with Anthony Miller on ER last week, Milla was asked what direction is the artist currently taking his career. “As you can see from the year start he has been doing a lot of international collabs so obviously a international him thing deh,” Lee Milla said.

Anthony Miller then suggested that Alkaline is not doing it internationally on the same level as Popcaan while saying that Popcaan has the edge. “I wouldn’t say that,” Lee Milla responded. Poppy has been linked with Drake and has collaborated with international acts like Young Thug and UK rapper Giggs. Alkaline recently collaborated with French Montana on his new album “Jungle Rules.”

Elton John – Philadelphia Freedom lyrics

Music by elton john
Lyrics by bernie taupin
Released as a uk single in february, 1975

I used to be a rolling stone
You know if the cause was right
Id leave to find the answer on the road
I used to be a heart beating for someone
But the times have changed
The less I say the more my work gets done

’cause I live and breathe this philadelphia freedom
From the day that I was born Ive waved the flag
Philadelphia freedom took me knee-high to a man
Yeah gave me peace of mind my daddy never had

Oh philadelphia freedom shine on me, I love you
Shine a light through the eyes of the ones left behind
Shine a light shine a light
Shine a light wont you shine a light
Philadelphia freedom I love you, yes I do

If you choose to you can live your life alone
Some people choose the city
Some others choose the good old family home
I like living easy without family ties
Till the whippoorwill of freedom zapped me
Right between the eyes

Onyx & Dope D.O.D. – Doomsday (Shotgunz In Hell Album)

[Intro: Jay Reaper]
Ey yo move mate I’m getting moody
Cause your music you don’t move me
I’m in the mood today to just shoot away
Nigga too cray Paul Mooney
Ya bitch niggas just tomb raid em
We crusade from here to UK
Like a new plague Its to late
We bring it, Doomsday

[Verse 1: Fredro Starr]
[?]
Not with the time but she a snowflake
In the bathroom taking a coke break
Doing crooked shit to get the dough straight
Fuck a jimbo we whole weight
Pushing pounds through the whole state
I got bullets in your brain just rotate
Leave a nigga body in a cold state
Rigamortis that’s when you go against niggas orders
Electric tape like Biggie thought us
The type that’ll kidnap niggas daughters
Half my niggas is brain dead
Eyes the color blood stained red
(now is not the time for fear, that comes later)
Like Bane said

[Hook: Jay Reaper]
Ey yo move mate I’m getting moody
Cause your music you don’t move me
I’m in the mood today to just shoot away
Nigga too cray Paul Mooney
Ya bitch niggas just tomb raid em
We crusade from here to UK
Like a new plague Its to late
We bring it, Doomsday

[Verse 2: Skits Vicious]
Gimmie the title I’m killin my rivals
And any beside them with evil intent
Trap it, Onyx D.O.D on it
We quick to demolish your feeble event
Read all about it we out here
[?]
Sticky and Dro fill em with holes
Vicious and Reap put em to sleep
Deadly vapors plastic tubes and respirators
Stack of paper, back to Vegas
Crack a bottle, smack a waiter
So and so they sew you up
Comatose you roasted duck
Back on the scene with a banger
Handle the heat with the hammer

[Verse 3: Sticky Fingas]
I’m still on paper fresh outta jail
No heavenly father i was raised in hell
Billy had her mother she was raised in bail
Sister around the corner selling fruit cocktails
Bitches on your knees niggas get your hands up
Whats it gonna be? either way imma bust
I’m movin overseas America is so fucked
Must’ve got drunk woke up and voted for Trump?
Its the end of the world and I’m holding a pump
Dick to your girl while she’s rolling my blunt
Drink in my hand while I’m slappin her butt
If its doomsday imma go nuts
Take you apart see what you’re made of
Playing a part, your whole life’s made up
Take out your heart, see what your brain does
Soon its death what you afraid of?

[Outro: Jay Reaper]
Ey yo move mate I’m getting moody
Cause your music you don’t move me
I’m in the mood today to just shoot away
Nigga too cray Paul Mooney
Ya bitch niggas just tomb raid em
We crusade from here to UK
Like a new plague Its to late
We bring it, Doomsday

Ace Hood – 2 Fux

Beast
( Renegade, renegade, renegade )
Uh, I wake up every morning, thank God, then I gotta get to it
I never had a role model, money was the only influence
While they was talkin’ ’bout it in the city I was really out doin’ it
Hundred bands I was 19 and the man, I knew it, okay
Thats around the time I shine had these niggas all hatin’
Same time I was grindin’ same time I was patient, you was standin’ with your hand out waitin’, yeah yeah
Imma keep it real, how it feel? I don’t give 2 fucks
Count another bag on the road I could never get enough
They wanna hang when I’m on where they were when the shit got tough
And what a nigga think about me? I don’t give 2 fucks
You don’t pay my bills, you don’t feed my kids, your opinion don’t matter
My pockets still gettin’ fatter
God damn and the last time I looked in the mirror I was starin’ at a real one
And fuck makin’ friends, where the ends at ’cause all my dogs need a million
I don’t give a fuck about poppin’ no bottles in the club
I’m focused on the money, I ain’t never going back the way I was
A lot of people asked why I drive it here then it get missin’
Sorry to my fans, I’ll be way more consistent
Haters get the middle finger, Lord be the witness, listen
Got a crib out west out in Cali when I touch down
Fired my old jeweler went and got a new jeweler made him [?]
I thinks it’s funny how they wanna be down all of a sudden young nigga gettin’ up now
Yeah, king of the city nigga, king of the state, turn beast when the sun down
I’m just really having fun now
Funny how that slick talk minimize when ya boy ’round
I just landed in the UK, in a suite with a pretty little freak sippin’ D’Ussé
Murda murda in the booth, aye
I’m a killer on the beat, increasin’ the crime rate
I need a mill, not an entrée
I need a Jay, no Beyoncé
Smoke like a choo train
Showin’ niggas how to do things
Boys biting on the flow, I changed up like a mood ring
Young nigga with a new flame
Don’t compare me to no mane
Top of the food chain, uh

Vanessa Hudgens & Ashley Tisdale – Ex’s & Oh’s (Elle King Cover)

[Verse 1]
Well, I had me a boy, turned him into a man
I showed him all the things that he didn’t understand
Whoa, and then I let him go
Now, there’s one in California who’s been cursing my name
Cause I found me a better lover in the UK
Hey, hey, until I made my getaway

[Pre-Chorus 1]
One, two, three, they gonna run back to me
Cause I’m the best baby that they never gotta keep
One, two, three, they gonna run back to me
They always wanna come, but they never wanna leave

[Chorus 1]
Ex’s and the oh, oh, oh’s they haunt me
Like ghosts they want me to make ’em O
They won’t let go
Ex’s and oh’s

[Verse 2]
I had a summer lover down in New Orleans
Kept him warm in the winter, left him frozen in the spring
My, my, how the seasons go by
I get high, and I love to get low
So the hearts keep breaking, and the heads just roll
You know that’s how the story goes

[Pre-Chorus 1]
One, two, three, they gonna run back to me
Cause I’m the best baby that they never gotta keep
One, two, three, they gonna run back to me
They always wanna come, but they never wanna leave

[Chorus 2]
Ex’s and the oh, oh, oh’s they haunt me
Like ghosts they want me to make ’em O
They won’t let go
Ex’s and the oh, oh, oh’s they haunt me
Like ghosts they want me to make ’em O
They won’t let go
Ex’s and oh’s

[Pre-Chorus 2]
One, two, three, they gonna run back to me
Climbing over mountains and a-sailing over seas
One, two, three, they gonna run back to me
They always wanna come, but they never wanna leave

[Chorus 2]
My ex’s and the oh, oh, oh’s they haunt me
Like ghosts they want me to make ‘em O
They won’t let go
Ex’s and the oh, oh, oh’s they haunt me
Like ghosts they want me to make ‘em O
They won’t let go
Ex’s and oh’s

Watsky – London Eclipse Lyrics

Come, the moon is over the sun
We’ll use the shadows to run
No one can stop us from leaving
Come, the moon is over the sun
We’ll use the shadows to run
No one can stop us from leaving

Breathing’s boring
What a stupid task it’s
Only 8 a.m. this train’s a moving casket
Brew it black and spike your coffee with your flask
Before you leave the house each day pull on your ‘fuck you’ mask
You know that sad disguise
You know that patch of lies
Commuters pull their papers wide so folks can’t catch their eyes
We let these years of tears build up and now it’s heavy stakes
And we might drown this city if we let these levees break
So I gotta get a grip
Show ‘em I won’t let it slip
I know that what’s done is done and so that’s why it’s dumb to trip
I’m not scratching at the walls, that’s London at my fingertips
They use the news from yesterday to wrap tomorrow’s fish and chips
So you can print me on pretty, colorful paper
Right next to the psycho bitch who allegedly stabbed her neighbor
And I’ll be looking back up atcha until you’re ready to crumple me up
Oh, oh, oh

[Hook]

At the last eclipse, I was living as a single man
My girl’s looking through a pinhole camera
That she made out of a Pringle’s can
Pointed upwards at a gray London sky, pretending she could see the sun (the sun)
And I’m really looking right at her thinking maybe she could be the one
We could run
New York, L.A., UK, what do you say
Got no plans
Got no faith
Another new sun, gonna bring a new day
I wait to queue for the Baker loo, then I take the tube
30 minutes heading to Kent
And I’m coming straight to you with a big bouquet
We’re not anchored
We got our freedom and we can wander any path that we wanna on the planet
Damn it we don’t even need a answer
And I’m looking at all the 9 to 5ers on the train
But all the 9 to 5ers on the train are lookin at your pretty faces
Lookin at the sun that only you can see up in the Evening Standard
This could be home to me
Home could be anywhere
We could be anywhere
We could be free
I’m happy with you
If you were somewhere new
Do you think you still could be happy with me?
Timing is key and our timing was keen
And time is as slow and so why should we baby
You make me weak in the knees
We could move every weekend but only if we can agree to where
Home could be anywhere
We could be anywhere
We could be free
I’m happy with you
If you were somewhere new
Do you think you still could be happy with me?
Timing is key and our timing was keen
And time is as slow and so why should we baby
You make me weak in the knees
We could move every weekend but only if we can agree to where

[Hook]

P Money – Keepin’ It Real

[Verse 1: P Money]
I just wanna make music
Hit the studio, create music
My fans purchase, download and play music
Seek melody, metaphor and rave music
That chill on the sofa and play music
Don’t want a beat, just wanna play music
Who am I kidding? I’ll beat when I play music and
If her boyfriend is talking smack
I’ve got that lead your girlfriend away music
I’ve got that wild, you’ve got that tame music
I’ve got that real, you’ve got that lame music
I’ve got that cosign, labels wanna sign the work of art
Belong in the Tate music
Grime, rap, UK bass music
That real easy to embrace music, and
Any MC that is thinking they’re rough
I’ve got that punch a man in their face music
That serve you [?] ace music
Black, white, don’t watch race music
Still here, kept my faith music
Ten years, never made no fake music
Man have been making that great music
You need to make that stay in your lane music
Cuh 2016, I’ll be touring Australia
Second time round like

[Pre-Hook: P Money]
I’ve been killing shows with no deal
I always keep it down to earth, I’m so real
I’m ready, I’m itching to go, can’t sit still
They’re so fake, they don’t even know how it feels when you’re

[Hook: P Money]
Trill, keeping it real
Trill, keeping it real
Trill, keeping it real
Trill, keeping it real
Trill, they don’t even know
How it feels when you’re
Trill, keeping it real
Trill, keeping it

[Verse 2: Stormzy]
If you’re gonna send then send for the top
Look, trust me, I get it (calm)
I’ll take that shot and I’ll take that shot
Yeah, I’m photogenic (calm)
But when I spray back and I ended careers
Don’t tell me to dead it (‘llow it)
Bare of these MCs hate me
But they still see me and beg it (pussies)
And I still came back with the game on my lap
Like “nobody move” (no one)
Tryna take care of my Gs
Ain’t tryna see nobody lose
But man try come for my team, I’ll dun him off
My man thought he’s a G, stop running off
I’ve got a crown and you’ve got a crown
But rudeboy, this crown here ain’t coming off (‘llow it)

[Pre-Hook: P Money]
I’ve been killing shows with no deal
I always keep it down to earth, I’m so real
I’m ready, I’m itching to go, can’t sit still
They’re so fake, they don’t even know how it feels when you’re

[Hook: P Money]
Trill, keeping it real
Trill, keeping it real
Trill, keeping it real
Trill, keeping it real
Trill, they don’t even know
How it feels when you’re
Trill, keeping it real
Trill, keeping it

[Verse 3: P Money]
Yo, I was one of the youngers that you couldn’t send shop
Yeah, I was a mummy’s boy, but never soft
I boxed man that thought they couldn’t get boxed
Topped MCs that thought they couldn’t be topped
When I flow on the riddim, I never get lost
When you flow on the riddim, you’re told “get lost”
Labels wanna know how I keep going hard
Thought I took a pill cuh my ting never went flop
Complete control, I could never get dropped
There was never a show that never went off
Milking it for so long and it never went off
Don’t know why, maybe it’s cause I never went pop
Helped out the game, man did that a lot
Bring us down to festivals, did that a lot
Man can chat shit about me doing dubstep
Told grime police man never bread cops
So I still spray on dubstep now, and what?
Wait, cut the beat out, let me talk to these lot
Let’s talk P, I’m on about me
First grime act packing at Wireless? Me
Spraying on “Eskimo” at Wireless? Me
Five years straight and still tireless? Me
When everybody got a deal and did what they feel
Who was here releasing grime CDs? Me and Jme
Grime tracks on every single EP? Me
Young MC that was duppying pirate? Me
Big MC still duppying pirate? Me
Doing shows worldwide, play a man’s vocal
Showing their country that it’s not just me
Who was doing that at the time? No one, me
There was more but I can’t fit it in a sixteen
Man just better respect me

[Pre-Hook: P Money]
I’ve been killing shows with no deal
I always keep it down to earth, I’m so real
I’m ready, I’m itching to go, can’t sit still
They’re so fake, they don’t even know how it feels when you’re

[Hook: P Money]
Trill, keeping it real
Trill, keeping it real
Trill, keeping it real
Trill, keeping it real
Trill, they don’t even know
How it feels when you’re
Trill, keeping it real
Trill, keeping it